Point of Persuasion, 2011

• kootenay marble & granite
• 19” H x 9” W x 6” D (48cm H x 23cm W x 15cm D)
• private collection, North Vancouver, BC, Canada

michael binkley sculptor sculpture original fine art gallery vancouver canada marble abstract

michael binkley sculptor sculpture original fine art gallery vancouver canada marble abstract

michael binkley sculptor sculpture original fine art gallery vancouver canada marble abstract

Sculptor Michael Binkley has been exploring a series of marble sculptures that emulate thin fabric and “Point of Persuasion” is another in this series. Other examples of these types of sculptures are “Surface of Awareness,” and “A Little Wrinkle.”

This sculpture is carved from white marble that was taken from the Petacchi quarry in the mountains above the famous own of Cararra, Italy. Cararra marble has long been acknowledged as the finest in the world for sculpture. Michelangelo insisted upon using varieties of Carrara marble for all his artworks.

In “Point of Persuasion,” Binkley has carved a tall, thin composition that has thin edges that have slight ripples near the bottom. These edges allow light to pass through and exemplify the translucency of Carrara marble. It almost seems as though the hard material is pliable and flexible. On one broad side, Binkley has carved a convex ovoid elliptical shape with a concave depression just below its centre. The shape leads the viewer’s imagination to a human abdomen and belly button. On the reverse side, he has carved a protruding vertical ridge down the centre and it bulges outwards at the point where the depression is on the other side. The overall effect looks as though the depresion on one side has resulted in a protuberance on the other, as if a needle has been pushed through the marble and forced the material to move.

Binkley has created a silky smooth matte finish on the sculpture which is wonderful to touch and gives the marble the ability to successfully hold shadow. He mounted the sculpture on a highly polished black granite base and the colour and surface is in contrast to the subject. The sculpture is permanently secured by a hidden metal pin.

Michael Binkley